Nov 2014 Precision Shooter-1

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Precision Shooter-1 has concluded. Thanks to the great group of shooters who dedicated their valuable time and hard earned $’s to come train with us over the past 2 days. This class is a class of firsts, it is the first of our 2 day format classes and the first with mandatory performance evaluations. Each shooter successfully passed their evaluations! Of the 5, 3 are individual effort, 2 are team oriented. We watched a shooter who “thought” he was struggling on day 1 and early day 2 snatch Victory from the jaws of defeat! Jeff – well done!

Feel free to post your reviews on Facebook under this thread.

– Sean

“1st Round, On Target, In Time, Always!”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

15 responses to “Nov 2014 Precision Shooter-1

  1. Fantastic after action report!

  2. Fantastic after action report!

  3. Fantastic after action report!

  4. Brian now that’s a AAR! Thank you.

  5. Brian now that’s a AAR! Thank you.

  6. Brian now that’s a AAR! Thank you.

  7. Jeffrey West Sean Brogan

  8. Jeffrey West Sean Brogan

  9. Jeffrey West Sean Brogan

  10. November 15 & 16 2014
    Center Mass Tactical Training
    Precision Shooter
    Coach Sean Brogan
    Taylorsville, Ga

    Equipment: Arsenal Democracy Reaper 33 AR 14.5, Horandy Superformance 5.56 75 gr BTHP match, SWFA SS 6×42 scope

    Let’s get one thing straight, so there are no misunderstandings. I work for Center Mass Tactical Training (CMTT), I am Sean Brogan’s Martial Arts coach, and he is my friend. I obviously like the guy, so this is going to be a little bias. Now on to the totally fair and balanced after action report.

    I have been shooting since I was twelve years old. North Georgia is thick woods, and the longest shot that I have taken was a little over 200 yards. Not really long range shooting, but my interest in precision shooting had been peaked by watching Sean Brogan shoot. Whenever he picked up a rifle, it became a pin point hole maker. Now I practiced, but I just did not wield the rifle with the same results. Sean would always say ” every Marine is a rifleman”. Look at Sean’s Bio, he is a little more that just your average marksmen. Well something was going on, and I wanted to learn how to shoot like that. I was a little concerned because my AR is a 14.5 inch barrel. Now Nicholas Irving set this rifle up, and it is a shooter. When I thought of precision rifle, it’s a .308, not a 5.56. Sean said that with the right ammo, my rifle could easily perform the requirements of he class. Cool, I am in.

    The first day we worked on NPA. What the hell is that? Natural point of aim, or the up down drill, as I like to call it. Now I know a little bit about shooting, but laying behind a rifle until you can basically fall asleep, getting a cheek weld, finding my natural pause in my breathing, staying on the reticle, and squeezing the trigger straight back, without disturbing any of the proceeding is very difficult. Now stand up and start over. For just laying around all day, this is really hard work. We would alternated between a short lecture and then practice, which really drove home each lesson. Next a performance exam, then repeat with the range and difficulty increasing. At the end of the day NPA was beginning to make sense. I left feeling that I understood my rifle, my ammunition, scope, and more importantly how to make accurate hits.

    The second day started with a cold bore shot. If you have not stripped all the copper out of the barrel, it should basically perform the same way. What was truly cold was my mind and nervous system. Trying to get that first shot, without any warm up is hard on the old noggin. Thanks to NPA ( natural point of aim, pay attention, precision shooting takes concentration ) everyone shot really well. Next we would learn how to work as a team, spotter and shooter. Communication is essential, and as men, it is something we excel at ( eye roll from the wife ). We learned how to use our cool toys, ballistic calculators, kestrels, scopes and math. Being a knuckle dragger, math is not my forte, but Sean used the KISS principle ( keep it simple, stupid) and we learned how to judge distance using mil dots. Distance and number of targets increased as the day went on. We learned how to read the wind. We learned how make adjustments, and how to communicate with each other. Sean kept giving us performance exams of greater difficulty. Pressure increased with distance, making my heart rate climb, which makes long shots much harder. 450 yards seemed hard until our final performance exam was given. Almost 700 yards, seven football fields, with a 5.56 75 grain bullet. We had a target rich environment, literally. Paper, steel, and evil robots, that only fall down when you hit them ( very unfair ).My partner saved my ass when I missed a couple of shots, thanks again Jeff West! You must trust your partner, or the team fails. Awesome! All 4 shooters passed all performance exams. I will not spoil the experience by telling you, come take the class, and you will get do them.

    This class will make you a precision shooter. I now know my rifle, equipment, and more importantly myself. Sean is a great coach, and can help anyone become a better marksmen. I can’t wait to take this class again.

  11. November 15 & 16 2014
    Center Mass Tactical Training
    Precision Shooter
    Coach Sean Brogan
    Taylorsville, Ga

    Equipment: Arsenal Democracy Reaper 33 AR 14.5, Horandy Superformance 5.56 75 gr BTHP match, SWFA SS 6×42 scope

    Let’s get one thing straight, so there are no misunderstandings. I work for Center Mass Tactical Training (CMTT), I am Sean Brogan’s Martial Arts coach, and he is my friend. I obviously like the guy, so this is going to be a little bias. Now on to the totally fair and balanced after action report.

    I have been shooting since I was twelve years old. North Georgia is thick woods, and the longest shot that I have taken was a little over 200 yards. Not really long range shooting, but my interest in precision shooting had been peaked by watching Sean Brogan shoot. Whenever he picked up a rifle, it became a pin point hole maker. Now I practiced, but I just did not wield the rifle with the same results. Sean would always say ” every Marine is a rifleman”. Look at Sean’s Bio, he is a little more that just your average marksmen. Well something was going on, and I wanted to learn how to shoot like that. I was a little concerned because my AR is a 14.5 inch barrel. Now Nicholas Irving set this rifle up, and it is a shooter. When I thought of precision rifle, it’s a .308, not a 5.56. Sean said that with the right ammo, my rifle could easily perform the requirements of he class. Cool, I am in.

    The first day we worked on NPA. What the hell is that? Natural point of aim, or the up down drill, as I like to call it. Now I know a little bit about shooting, but laying behind a rifle until you can basically fall asleep, getting a cheek weld, finding my natural pause in my breathing, staying on the reticle, and squeezing the trigger straight back, without disturbing any of the proceeding is very difficult. Now stand up and start over. For just laying around all day, this is really hard work. We would alternated between a short lecture and then practice, which really drove home each lesson. Next a performance exam, then repeat with the range and difficulty increasing. At the end of the day NPA was beginning to make sense. I left feeling that I understood my rifle, my ammunition, scope, and more importantly how to make accurate hits.

    The second day started with a cold bore shot. If you have not stripped all the copper out of the barrel, it should basically perform the same way. What was truly cold was my mind and nervous system. Trying to get that first shot, without any warm up is hard on the old noggin. Thanks to NPA ( natural point of aim, pay attention, precision shooting takes concentration ) everyone shot really well. Next we would learn how to work as a team, spotter and shooter. Communication is essential, and as men, it is something we excel at ( eye roll from the wife ). We learned how to use our cool toys, ballistic calculators, kestrels, scopes and math. Being a knuckle dragger, math is not my forte, but Sean used the KISS principle ( keep it simple, stupid) and we learned how to judge distance using mil dots. Distance and number of targets increased as the day went on. We learned how to read the wind. We learned how make adjustments, and how to communicate with each other. Sean kept giving us performance exams of greater difficulty. Pressure increased with distance, making my heart rate climb, which makes long shots much harder. 450 yards seemed hard until our final performance exam was given. Almost 700 yards, seven football fields, with a 5.56 75 grain bullet. We had a target rich environment, literally. Paper, steel, and evil robots, that only fall down when you hit them ( very unfair ).My partner saved my ass when I missed a couple of shots, thanks again Jeff West! You must trust your partner, or the team fails. Awesome! All 4 shooters passed all performance exams. I will not spoil the experience by telling you, come take the class, and you will get do them.

    This class will make you a precision shooter. I now know my rifle, equipment, and more importantly myself. Sean is a great coach, and can help anyone become a better marksmen. I can’t wait to take this class again.

  12. November 15 & 16 2014
    Center Mass Tactical Training
    Precision Shooter
    Coach Sean Brogan
    Taylorsville, Ga

    Equipment: Arsenal Democracy Reaper 33 AR 14.5, Horandy Superformance 5.56 75 gr BTHP match, SWFA SS 6×42 scope

    Let’s get one thing straight, so there are no misunderstandings. I work for Center Mass Tactical Training (CMTT), I am Sean Brogan’s Martial Arts coach, and he is my friend. I obviously like the guy, so this is going to be a little bias. Now on to the totally fair and balanced after action report.

    I have been shooting since I was twelve years old. North Georgia is thick woods, and the longest shot that I have taken was a little over 200 yards. Not really long range shooting, but my interest in precision shooting had been peaked by watching Sean Brogan shoot. Whenever he picked up a rifle, it became a pin point hole maker. Now I practiced, but I just did not wield the rifle with the same results. Sean would always say ” every Marine is a rifleman”. Look at Sean’s Bio, he is a little more that just your average marksmen. Well something was going on, and I wanted to learn how to shoot like that. I was a little concerned because my AR is a 14.5 inch barrel. Now Nicholas Irving set this rifle up, and it is a shooter. When I thought of precision rifle, it’s a .308, not a 5.56. Sean said that with the right ammo, my rifle could easily perform the requirements of he class. Cool, I am in.

    The first day we worked on NPA. What the hell is that? Natural point of aim, or the up down drill, as I like to call it. Now I know a little bit about shooting, but laying behind a rifle until you can basically fall asleep, getting a cheek weld, finding my natural pause in my breathing, staying on the reticle, and squeezing the trigger straight back, without disturbing any of the proceeding is very difficult. Now stand up and start over. For just laying around all day, this is really hard work. We would alternated between a short lecture and then practice, which really drove home each lesson. Next a performance exam, then repeat with the range and difficulty increasing. At the end of the day NPA was beginning to make sense. I left feeling that I understood my rifle, my ammunition, scope, and more importantly how to make accurate hits.

    The second day started with a cold bore shot. If you have not stripped all the copper out of the barrel, it should basically perform the same way. What was truly cold was my mind and nervous system. Trying to get that first shot, without any warm up is hard on the old noggin. Thanks to NPA ( natural point of aim, pay attention, precision shooting takes concentration ) everyone shot really well. Next we would learn how to work as a team, spotter and shooter. Communication is essential, and as men, it is something we excel at ( eye roll from the wife ). We learned how to use our cool toys, ballistic calculators, kestrels, scopes and math. Being a knuckle dragger, math is not my forte, but Sean used the KISS principle ( keep it simple, stupid) and we learned how to judge distance using mil dots. Distance and number of targets increased as the day went on. We learned how to read the wind. We learned how make adjustments, and how to communicate with each other. Sean kept giving us performance exams of greater difficulty. Pressure increased with distance, making my heart rate climb, which makes long shots much harder. 450 yards seemed hard until our final performance exam was given. Almost 700 yards, seven football fields, with a 5.56 75 grain bullet. We had a target rich environment, literally. Paper, steel, and evil robots, that only fall down when you hit them ( very unfair ).My partner saved my ass when I missed a couple of shots, thanks again Jeff West! You must trust your partner, or the team fails. Awesome! All 4 shooters passed all performance exams. I will not spoil the experience by telling you, come take the class, and you will get do them.

    This class will make you a precision shooter. I now know my rifle, equipment, and more importantly myself. Sean is a great coach, and can help anyone become a better marksmen. I can’t wait to take this class again.

  13. Shooters – Post your reviews in this thread on Facebook.

  14. Shooters – Post your reviews in this thread on Facebook.

  15. Shooters – Post your reviews in this thread on Facebook.